masthead-highres

Wednesday, October 12, 2005

Gerhard Schroeder: Anglo-Saxons Are to Blame, Boo-Hoo-Hoo

Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, showing the temper and reasoning ability of a kindergartener, lashed out at George Bush's handling of Katrina today, apparently hoping to distract attention from the fact that his professional and private lives are utter disasters.

From Reuters:
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, who has led Germany since 1998, said for the first time on Wednesday he would not play a role in the next government, in an emotional farewell including broadsides at the United States and Britain.

...He quickly composed himself, hitting his stride in a passionate defense of a strong German state and lashing out at 'Anglo-Saxon' economic policies favored in Britain and the United States, which he said had 'no chance' in Europe. In an apparent reference to Hurricane Katrina, Schroeder castigated Washington for liberal, hands-off policies that left it exposed in times of crisis. The Bush administration was widely criticised for its response to the devastating storm. 'I do not want to name any catastrophes where you can see what happens if organized state action is absent. I could name countries, but the position I still hold forbids it, but everyone knows I mean America,' he said to loud applause.
My paternal ancestors were German. They came to America and thrived under "Anglo-Saxon economics." Apparently Schroeder believes modern-day Germans have none of my ancestors' fine qualities.

Ralph Peters has a nice pre-buttal to Schroeder and others in "Old Europe" ("We thought you were adults, but, from across the Atlantic, you look like spoiled children.") circa May 2003.

Germany, wake up. The world likes your money, but if you don't get your work ethic back, you'll lose even the friends you bought.

Addendum: Ace of Spaces wasn't as kind to Schroeder as I was.

Addendum #2, 10/13: Debra Saunders has a look at "our betters" in Europe on Townhall.com, while David's Medienkritik zings Schroeder from up close.

Posted by Amy Ridenour at 2:09 PM

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