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Thursday, December 17, 2009

The Poet Al Gore

Al Gore is testing out a new strategy to incite fear of catastrophic global warming. Not content to be a seer limited to prophecies in prose, Gore has treated us to a rare glimpse of his more sensitive, artistic side.

Yes, Al Gore has penned a poem (included in his most recent book, "Our Choice - A plan to solve the climate crisis"), detailing his apocalyptic forecast for a planet subjected to human progress based in carbon consumption.

...And for your viewing pleasure: a reading by the author himself (feel free to follow along):
Untitled

by Al Gore

One thin September soon
A floating continent disappears
In midnight sun
Vapors rise as
Fever settles on an acid sea
Neptune's bones dissolve
Snow glides from the mountain
Ice fathers floods for a season
A hard rain comes quickly
Then dirt is parched
Kindling is placed in the forest
For the lightning's celebration
Unknown creatures
Take their leave, unmourned
Horsemen ready their stirrups
Passion seeks heroes and friends
The bell of the city
On the hill is rung
The shepherd cries
The hour of choosing has arrived
Here are your tools
In celebration of America's most recent climatological poet laureate, I too have penned a poem -- albeit a short and quick limerick (...but praise is in order for the self-restraint I marshaled to keep such a notoriously obscene style of poetry clean) and I encourage anyone with a moment of artistic inspiration to take a dive into this new world of Algoretry - poetry pertaining to, addressed to, or by the great Al Gore and his hypocritical liberty-hampering plans for we plebs.
Al Gore's Motivation

by Caroline May

There once was a huckster named Gore
Whose speeches were oh such a bore
He spoke nothing but lies
And filled us with "whys?"
Seems his green eyes just wanted more!
Written by Caroline May, policy analyst at the National Center for Public Policy Research. Write the author at [email protected]. As we occasionally reprint letters on the blog, please note if you prefer that your correspondence be kept private, or only published anonymously.


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Posted by Caroline May at 10:31 AM

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