What is Environmental Justice? Do Black Americans Want and Need It?

Everyone benefits from a cleaner environment, but not everyone is forced to shoulder the same economic and regulatory burden to meet the government's standards for a clean environment. African-Americans and the poor are often forced to take on an unfair share of the costs and sacrifices that must be made to meet the government's environmental regulations.

In 1994, President Bill Clinton signed Executive Order 12898 that required federal officials to identify and address "disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects of its programs, policies and activities on minority populations and low-income Americans." Instead of easing the burden on these communities, the government's "environmental justice" policy has made things harder in many cases. Without reform, the government's attempt to address undue environmental harm to minorities will actually cause more harm.

The Center for Environmental Justice

A compilation of the press releases, op-ed/commentaries and other publications issued by The National Center for Public Policy Research and Project 21 dealing with the issue of the environment and the poor and minorities. Click here for a full list.

A Selection of African-American Environmental Heroes

Read the biographies of some of the people in the African-American community who have contributed to the goals of conservation and environmental stewardship by clicking here.

History of Black Environmentalism

How have blacks been a part of environmental issues in the United States and elsewhere? Click here to find out.

 
The Center for Environmental Justice is a joint program of Project 21 and the National Center for Public Policy Research's Center for Environmental and Regulatory Affairs

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