National Center for Public Policy Research press release


For Release: August 27, 2015
Contact:
Judy Kent at (703) 759-7476 or jkent@nationalcenter.org

 

Are Spurious Claims of Police Racism Fueling Ideological Attacks Upon Whites by People With Troubled Psyches?

In Light of Virginia Journalist Killings, Project 21's Joe Hicks Fears People with Mental Psychosis and Other Brain Disorders are Responding Dangerously to the Re-Birth of Militant Black Protests

 

Washington, D.C. - "Did the ideology of black racial victimization play a role in the murder of a white Virginia TV news reporter and her cameraman?" asks Joe Hicks, a political commentator and member of Project 21.

"When Dylann Roof walked into Charleston's historic Emanuel African Methodist Church and shot down nine black members of a Bible study group his actions were not informed by organized, active white supremacist groups - a movement that thankfully largely lies in bankrupt, embarrassed tatters. He acted as a detached, demented lone wolf, driven by his singular attachment racism, combining perhaps with mental instability," said Hicks, who is vice president of Community Advocates. Inc., a private Los Angeles-based political think-tank.

"However, I think we do need to probe farther into the actions of Mass black killers like Christopher Dorner, a black ex-LAPD cop who went on a killing mission in 2013 to right supposed racial wrongs he believed had been done to him. The latest of this breed seems to be Vester Flanagan, AKA Bryce Williams, a disgruntled former employee of a Virginia news station who killed two people and blamed all of his woes on supposed racist whites. Since the killing of the teenage Trayvon Martin, we have seen a re-birth of militant black protests, as well as violence and riots in Ferguson and Baltimore; all based primarily in the belief that blacks are somehow victims of a revitalized and new white racism, and that 'white cops' shoot black youth 'for no good reason,'" Hicks added.

"Beliefs in racial mythology and victimization lie at the base of the 'Black Lives Matter' movement, whose members stridently argue that cops will shoot black youth even when they have their 'hands up' - even though this claim has largely been found to be baseless. What effect have these spurious claims had on those with troubled psyches? Are such views now combining with mental psychosis and other brain disorders in the mentally troubled, in effect ideologically fueling attacks on innocent whites - as we saw recently with two unsuspecting individuals, Alison Parker and Adam Ward?"

Joe HicksFor more than 35 years, Joe Hicks has been an active and high-profile figure. Beginning in the turbulent 1960s and into the 1990s, Hicks' views were aligned with what he describes as the "orthodoxy of left-liberalism." By the mid-1990s, he began a lengthy re-examination process that resulted in dramatically-altered political views and positions. Today, his views often stand at odds with the beliefs with which he was long associated, and he now identifies himself as a political conservative.

Representing Project 21, Hicks has been a guest on the Fox News Channel, CNN, NBC, Newsmax TV, SiriusXM satellite radio, USA Radio Network, Salem Broadcasting, Westwood One and other national television and radio networks, and his opinion articles and interviews have appeared in national and international print media such as the Washington Post and Orlando Sentinel. A former analyst and commentator for PJTV.com, he hosted "The Hicks File" and "The Minority Report" programs for the web-based media outlet. From 2005 to 2008, he also hosted the weekly "Joe Hicks Show" on KFI-AM in Los Angeles.

Prior to co-founding CAI, Hicks served as the executive director of the Los Angeles City Human Relations Commission from 1997 to 2001. In the early 1990s, Hicks was executive director of the Greater Los Angeles chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference -- the civil rights group formed by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Hicks previously served as a member of the Board of Governors for the California State Bar as well as on the California Advisory Panel to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

To contact Mr. Joe Hicks or other members of the Project 21 black leadership network to discuss these issues, please contact Judy Kent at (703) 759-7476 or jkent@nationalcenter.org.

Project 21, a leading voice of black conservatives for over two decades, is sponsored by the National Center for Public Policy Research (http://www.nationalcenter.org). The National Center for Public Policy Research, founded in 1982, is a non-partisan, free-market, independent conservative think-tank.

-30-


Donation button

Home | Donate | Subscribe | Search | About Us | What's New | Blog | Twitter


National Center Logo

20 F Street NW, Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20001
(202) 507-6398
Fax (301) 498-1301
E-Mail: info@nationalcenter.org
Web: www.nationalcenter.org