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New Law of the Sea Treaty Website to Help Close "Information Gap" About Treaty

Resources from Scholars, Writers and Bloggers Will Explain Concerns about LOST to Public, Policymakers


For Release: October 31, 2007
Contact: David Almasi at (202) 543-4110 x11
or [email protected]


Washington, D.C. - As the Senate Foreign Relations Committee votes on the controversial Law of the Sea Treaty October 31, The National Center for Public Policy Research is unveiling a new website providing educational resources on the Law of the Sea Treaty (also known by the acronyms LOST and UNCLOS).

"The Law of the Sea Treaty is a terrible deal for the U.S.  It would threaten our sovereignty, place a significant portion of the world's resources under the control of a U.N.-style body, and complicate our efforts to apprehend terrorists on the high seas by subjecting our actions to review by an international court unlikely to render decisions favorable to the U.S.," said National Center Vice President David Ridenour. 

"The Law of the Sea Treaty would help radical environmentalists achieve what they haven't been able to achieve through legislation," Ridenour added.  "Greenpeace has said 'the benefits of the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea are substantial, including its basic duties for states to protect and preserve the marine environment and to conserve marine living species.'  The Natural Resources Defense Council challenged the Navy's use of 'intense active sonar,' arguing that it violates the treaty by posing a danger to marine life.  The Navy ultimately agreed to scale back use of this technology.  The Law of the Sea Treaty has also been used by Australia and New Zealand in an attempt to shut down an experimental blue fin tuna fishing program and by Ireland in an attempt to shut down a plant on land in England."

The website, the United National Law of the Sea Treaty Information Center, contains a collection of research papers, commentaries and blog entries about LOST from a variety of think-tanks, scholars, opinion writers and bloggers.  It can be accessed at http://www.unlawoftheseatreaty.org.

"Although the Law of the Sea Treaty has been around for decades -- the National Center for Public Policy Research first worked on it in 1982 -- relatively few people know much about it," said Amy Ridenour, president of the National Center for Public Policy Research.  "The United Nations Law of the Sea Treaty Information Center website is designed to help correct this."

The National Center for Public Policy Research is a non-partisan, non-profit educational foundation based in Washington, D.C.

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