masthead-highres

Monday, January 11, 2010

Quote of Note: Secret Deals Are No Way to Plan a Ski Trip, Let Alone a Health Care System

"Under wraps. Behind closed doors. Backroom deals. These phrases crop up again and again in reports of the Democrats' health care legislation.

Would you go along with any plan that had these sinister signs swirling 'round it? Would you even go on a weekend ski trip if the details were kept under wraps, negotiated with backroom deals behind closed doors?

Of course not. And yet we are going to allow the government to take control of one-sixth of the economy and our health care?"

Matt Patterson, Policy Analyst, National Center for Public Policy Research, "Accountability, Transparency are Casualties of Health Care Debate," Washington Examiner, January 11, 2010


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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 2:11 PM

Sunday, October 18, 2009

Another Thought About Rush

Another observation about Rush and the NFL:
Unlike the opposition, Rush Limbaugh handled this situation with class. But let this be a warning! This is a good snapshot of what is happening to OUR country. How dare the left stand on their soap box and play the race card. So far their objectives and goals about Rush Limbaugh are the only transparent objectives and goals of this administration.

Best regards,

Jeanne

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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 8:03 AM

Friday, October 16, 2009

Quote of Note: Did Rush Really Lose?

"...most of the same people who want Limbaugh ostracized are the same ones who think it is OK for Roman Polanski to drug and rape a 13 year old. These are also the same people, the white ones, who do not want Michael Vice to ever play again, or at least to make his life a living hell as long as he does play.

In the end, and to their shame, the group of potential owners caved in and removed Rush Limbaugh from the investor group saying that it was not worth it to keep Rush involved if it risked their not getting the franchise.

In the past 2 days ESPN and other media outlets have been announcing that Rush Limbaugh has been punted, and there is I am sure great rejoicing in this in many quarters, particularly in the black community and on the left. They see this as some great victory. This is very sad. Why? Because I ask the simple question, who really won and who really lost? Did Rush really lose? Did black players or even more so black Americans win?

Rush is still the most popular radio personality in America. He will still earn over $25 million a year, and he will still want Barack Obama to fail. Nothing has changed.

At the same time, will one black child do better in school? Will one less gang killing take place in Chicago, Philly LA. Will the Rams play any better? The answer is of course no. No new jobs have been created and Iran, North Korea are still feverishly building nuclear weapons.

This is a sad state for our nation. Black America in the grip of the Liberal establishment is more addicted to mediocrity than they are to 'Crack Cocaine.' They are the willing pawns in the Liberal game. This is a sad state. In the end everyone that needs to win loses."

-Eddie Huff, "NFL vs. Rush Limbaugh - Who's The Real Loser," New Black Thought, October 14, 2009


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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 11:56 PM

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Quote of Note: Nobel Peace Prize Winners in Perspective

"The list of Nobel peace laureates is not an especially august one. I've never heard of most of the people on it, and I'd bet you haven't either. So I have no comment on them. Then there are the perfectly ridiculous ones, the paradigmatic figure being the Guatemalan peasant, Rigobertu Menchu Tum, who literally invented her life, for which fabrication the custodians of the prize bestowed it on her.

Yasser Arafat -- well, yes, Yasser Arafat -- spent his life as a murderer, and he got a Nobel, too.

Kofi Annan received the Nobel as well. Perhaps for Bosnia, where he delayed an intervention by the West, and for Rwanda, where he literally prevented both the United Nations and the United States from intervening. I don't know what the Bosnian death toll attributable to him is. But we all know how many Tutsis were murdered in the Rwanda enormity. One million. The jackpot.

Frank B. Kellogg and Aristide Briand each became a Nobel Peace Laureate for designing an international treaty outlawing war. It was approved by all of the salient governments. Within a decade, however, the world had gone to war ... to World War II."

-Marty Peretz, "Obama Would Have Been Better Off Saying Simply 'I Am Not Worthy' or 'Nolo Episcopari'," The New Republic, October 11, 2009.


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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 11:06 PM

Saturday, August 22, 2009

Quote of Note: Median Wait Between Referral to a Specialist and Treatment in Canada is 17.3 Weeks

"In 2008, the median wait time from general practitioner referral to treatment by a specialist was 17.3 weeks in Canada. Despite substantial increases in both health spending and federal cash transfers to the provinces for health care over the last decade or so, that wait time was 45 per cent longer than the overall median wait time of 11.9 weeks back in 1997. It was 86 per cent longer than the overall median wait time of 9.3 weeks in 1993.

"Canada's waiting lists are also, according to the available evidence, among the longest in the developed world. For example, a 2007 survey of individuals published in the journal Health Affairs found that Canadians, as compared to patients in Australia, New Zealand, Germany, the Netherlands, the U.K. and the U.S., were most likely to wait more than one month for elective surgery, six days or longer to see a doctor when ill, and two hours or more for access to the ER."

-Nadeem Esmail, "Medicare Deserves its 'Whipping Boy' Status," The Chronicle Herald, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 14, 2009


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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 10:54 PM

Friday, August 21, 2009

How Rationing Begins

"Whenever anything has a zero explicit price associated with it, consumer demand will increase substantially, and healthcare is no exception. At the same time, bureaucratic bungling will guarantee gross inefficiencies that will get worse and worse each year. As costs get out of control and begin to embarrass those who have promised all Americans a free healthcare lunch, the politicians will do what all governments do and impose price controls, probably under some euphemism such as 'global budget controls.'

"Price controls, or laws that force prices down below market-clearing levels (where supply and demand are coordinated), artificially stimulate the amount demanded by consumers while reducing supply by making it unprofitable to supply as much as previously. The result of increased demand and reduced supply is shortages. Non-price rationing becomes necessary. This means that government bureaucrats, not individuals and their doctors, inevitably determine who will get medical treatment and who will not, what kind of medical technology will be available, how many doctors there will be, and so forth."

-Thomas DiLorenzo, "Socialized Healthcare vs. The Laws of Economics," Whiskey and Gunpowder blog, August 20, 2009


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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 8:33 AM

Thursday, August 20, 2009

Quote of Note: Under Socialized Medicine, Rationing is Inevitable

"As FA Hayek pointed out many years ago in his masterpiece, The Constitution of Liberty, if healthcare is paid for out of general taxation and delivered free at the point of delivery, then in a world of scarce resources - and healthcare is always constrained at any time by the supply of doctors, drugs, etc - then such care must be rationed by some form of bureaucratic/political rule...

...Now a socialist might respond that it is still better for health care to be rationed by some rule they consider to be 'fair' than by the supposed lottery of the market, although in fact, as I would respond, there is, due to the benefits of competition and entrepreneurship, far greater chance that all but the poorest will get better healthcare under a genuine free market in health than under the system of centralised, state-provided healthcare."

-Johnathan Pearce, "Under Socialised Medicine, Tough Rationing Choices are Inevitable," Samizdata.net, August 19, 2009


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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 12:03 PM

Wednesday, June 03, 2009

Quote of Note: Obama on the Need for Justices to Have "Empathy"

"...while adherence to legal precedent and rules of statutory or constitutional construction will dispose of 95 percent of the cases that come before a court, so that both a Scalia and a Ginsburg will arrive at the same place most of the time on those 95 percent of the cases -- what matters on the Supreme Court is those 5 percent of cases that are truly difficult. In those cases, adherence to precedent and rules of construction and interpretation will only get you through the 25th mile of the marathon. That last mile can only be determined on the basis of one's deepest values, one's core concerns, one's broader perspectives on how the world works, and the depth and breadth of one's empathy.

"In those 5 percent of hard cases, the constitutional text will not be directly on point. The language of the statute will not be perfectly clear. Legal process alone will not lead you to a rule of decision. In those circumstances, your decisions about whether affirmative action is an appropriate response to the history of discrimination in this country or whether a general right of privacy encompasses a more specific right of women to control their reproductive decisions or whether the commerce clause empowers Congress to speak on those issues of broad national concern that may be only tangentially related to what is easily defined as interstate commerce, whether a person who is disabled has the right to be accommodated so they can work alongside those who are nondisabled -- in those difficult cases, the critical ingredient is supplied by what is in the judge's heart."

-Barack Obama, Senate Floor Speech on the Confirmation of Judge John Roberts, September 2005


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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 6:16 AM

Quote of Note: Obama on the Senate's Advise and Consent Role

"As we all know, there's been a lot of discussion in the country about how the Senate should approach this confirmation process. There are some who believe that the President, having won the election, should have the complete authority to appoint his nominee, and the Senate should only examine whether or not the Justice is intellectually capable and an all-around nice guy. That once you get beyond intellect and personal character, there should be no further question whether the judge should be confirmed.

"I disagree with this view. I believe firmly that the Constitution calls for the Senate to advise and consent. I believe that it calls for meaningful advice and consent that includes an examination of a judge's philosophy, ideology, and record..."

-Barack Obama, Floor Statement on the Confirmation of Judge Samuel Alito, Jr., January 26, 2006


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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 12:02 AM

Thursday, May 14, 2009

Quote of Note

"For liberal elites, belief in gun control and global warming has taken on the character of religious faith. We have sinned (by hoarding guns or driving sport utility vehicles), we must atone (by turning in our guns or recycling), we must repent (by supporting gun control or cap-and-trade schemes). You may notice that the 'we' in question is usually the great mass of ordinary American citizens."

-Michael Barone, "On Guns and Climate, the Elites are Out of Touch," Washington Examiner, May 10, 2009


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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 6:17 AM

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Quote of Note

"What does a banana republic do? It tries to jail political opponents after defeating them and spends more money than it will ever have."
-Fred Barnes, Twitter, April 25, 2009



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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 12:26 PM

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Quote of Note

"We have a president whose foreign policy can only be described as 'anti-American.'"
-Dick Morris, speaking on the O'Reilly Factor, April 22, 2009


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Posted by Amy Ridenour at 11:30 AM

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